If you are a mid-size or larger business, you have an overworked security team. Those teams have responsibility across dozens of business areas, from executive protections, to cyber defense, to insider threat and more, many with competing priorities. Increasingly, security practitioners recognize that protecting customer or individual privacy is the most proactive way to protect the most important and sensitive activities of an organization (Apple Declines new API’s Due to Privacy Concerns).

The challenge is in the implementation – some companies with in-house engineering skill, or the resources to hire consulting firms, have tried to enact “enterprise privacy” by cobbling together integrations of “no track” VPN providers, isolated browsers, and imposing increasingly strict firewall and application rules. The end result is an increasingly costly environment to maintain and, in the end, a net decrease of the end user productivity with restrictions on internet services. In fact, these environments can be so brittle they actually increase the chance of compromise, since failure of one piece in this puzzle. For example, last month seven ‘no log’ Hong Kong VPN providers were accused of leaking 1.2TB of user logs onto the internet via unsecured Elasticsearch cluster (“No track” UFO VPN exposes user data). If any company or individual employees used those servers during that time, they were exposed and were ripe targets for hacking. Whether this was a misconfiguration or something worse, exposed VPNs are just one example of the fragility that comes with home-grown privacy solutions.

The goal should be to isolate external-facing internet activity and implement an architecture that enables zero-trust. While that sentence is buzzword heavy, the isolation approach limits exposure of any one component of a system, so if a VPN is compromised it doesn’t necessarily mean the company will be impacted. Also, when you bring in zero-trust concepts to a completely controlled environment, a company can increase the level of data sharing that is available while at the same time increasing data protection and privacy. Expect and ask more from the tech industry.

Grey Market Labs is a Public Benefit Corporation founded with the social mission to protect life online. We build revolutionary software and hardware products, and partner with like-minded industry leaders, to create a future with “privacy-as-a-service”.

Simply: we prevent data from being compromised and protect our customers work, online.

Contact us to see how we can work together.

Leave a Reply